Homemade Applesauce

  I feel like the apple craze hit me a little later than usual this year. Maybe because the weather has been pretty warm and it hasn’t felt like fall. Anyway, this past week the need for apples and apple treats hit hard. This week also happened to be the week our school transforms the gym into an apple pie factory. We make over 7,000 pies in 2 days and then sell them to raise money for the school. It’s our biggest and best smelling fundraiser, with the sweet smell of apples, cinnamon and sugar filling the halls.

Enter homemade applesauce. I cook it in the Crockpot, and it makes the whole house smell like heaven.

Ingredients:

  • 10 apples  (I typically use a variety of kinds including Empire, Gala, McIntosh, and Fuji)
  • ½ cup water
  • ½ sugar  (If you like sweet applesauce, or are using tart apples, you can add up to a cup)
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • Splash of lemon juice
  • Other optional ingredients include: honey, nutmeg, allspice

Directions:

  1. Core and peel the apples. The nice thing about this sauce is that you don’t have to peel everything perfectly. If a little bit of the peel is left on an apple here and there, it’s fine!
  2. Chop the apples into smaller pieces and dump them into the crockpot.
  3. Add the water, sugar, and any other ingredients to taste.
  4. Cook on low for about 4 hours, stirring and mashing the apples occasionally.
  5. I like my sauce on the chunky side, so once the apples are soft, I mash as much as I can with a wooden spoon, but leave some chunks. If you like your applesauce smoother, you can use a blender to puree it further.

This applesauce is awesome warm, however it can be stored in the refrigerator for several days, or put into the freezer and last a few months. Mine never lasts that long, especially now that my son has a new found love 

of this special He wanted to eat the entire batch!

So grab some apples, let the sweet apple aromas fill your kitchen and enjoy!

Moon Phase Madness

There was something in the air this past week. Did you feel it? Kids were super restless and even naughty. Teachers were on edge. Nothing seemed to go as planned. Did you also know it was a full moon at the end of last week? Yup. Does that explain things?

Why is it that kids seem to get a little crazy when the full moon appears? Scientists (like the ones here from Weather.com) say that this is a myth. Although studies have shown kids do get less sleep during a full moon, this is only about 1% of their sleep and should not account for much difference in behavior. Yet, ask any classroom teacher, and I think they would disagree…right? I hope this isn’t just me. I know I would gladly invite those scientists to my classroom during a full moon week and allow them to teach for “research” purposes. Good luck.

Last week my class also studied the moon phases. How perfect. So in light of the Moon, here are some great resources to teach with!

My favorite: The Moon Song (Rock Version)

This youtube video is my all time favorite. The cheesy music, the monotone rap/singing, the repetitive words… all perfect reasons to show a class of middle school students. Though there are many songs that describe the moon phases, this one tops them all. It sticks in their heads forever, which is exactly the purpose when you want them to memorize the moon phases! Thank you songsofhigherlearning!

Oreo Phases

I have never done this in my own classroom, but I know of other teachers who successfully taught the phases with Oreos at my school. It seems like a great idea! “Kids, lick off the frosting to the correct Moon phases!” You may get a few that “accidentally” mess up, but students would be engaged for sure. Sciencebob.com has an explanation here with a pdf to help.

oreo_moon_phases

Birthday Moon Phases

This is an activity that I have done in my classroom. It’s from Mysciencesite.com. Students figure out what phase the moon will be in on their next birthday, plus the days before and after. Listed are a few websites that can direct students on how to figure this out. It’s a good way to help practice the different phases as well.

For the Toddlers

This last one is for the littles. I found this idea at A Dab of Glue Will Do and love it. My son is obsessed with seeing the Moon and I know he would love to make his own! With just foil and paint, kids can make the Moon to look semi-realistic!

Morse Code Device

Electricity is such a fun topic to cover in my classroom. Although it is not technically part of my standards in 8th grade, I still cover circuits and how they work. My students love developing different types of circuits, trying to get the bulbs to light in different ways. I know electricity is included in other grade level standards, so this could easily be used or adapted for another grade level too. I have actually heard of 3rd graders doing a similar task.

The problem I use for this activity is as follows:

A toy company wants you to design a new product. The company wants a communication device that is similar to a telegraph. The device will use light instead of sound as a signal. The device will use light instead of sound as a signal. Kids will use the device to communicate in Morse code.

I like including device being a toy for kids. This creates a new way of thinking about the device. We discuss what kids would need – something safe, easy to use, and of course, fun! We also discuss why this would light up and not make noise 🙂 I usually need to stress that this will just be a prototype of the electronic part of the toy though, and will not be the final product. Later, as an add on, sometimes I have the students make flyers for their toy and they can model any additional features. For example, one group had “plans” to make their electric circuit a part of a toy car. When kids would use the Morse code device, they would design the headlights of the car to turn on and off. Rather than actually creating the car (since we didn’t have the tools to do so) the students could make their flyer displaying image of their “final product”.

I allowed each group of students to use the following materials in their design:

  • Battery (in a holder if you have it)
  • Light bulb (in holder)
  • Wire
  • Clothespin
  • 2 craft sticks
  • Toothpick
  • Paper clip
  • Rubber band
  • Piece of cardboard (students could cut or alter this in any way
  • Aluminum foil
  • Scissors
  • Tape
  • Morse code chart (mine came from my original curriculum, but you can find a similar printable online, like this one)

The first challenge was for the group to create a functional circuit that could easily be turned on and off. Some groups had t
heir circuits set up so that when you pressed the button, the light would turn off. Although they could write in Morse code, this didn’t really work for the toy. Most parents want the toy OFF when no one is using it.

There are always a few good designs that work really well, and others that we believe would be more difficult for kids to use. This activity really starts up great conversations about working for a client. In this case, the client would be a toy company — you are building it for a child. Therefore, the students had to think about their designs in a way that would work for a kid.   

Testing

After the circuits had been put together, students tested out their Morse Code toys by writing down simple messages in Morse Code. I tried to encourage one or two word messages and students quickly understood why! It took awhile for them to translate their messages to Morse Code! One person from the group then used the device to “light” the message while their partner(s) wrote down the Morse code they were seeing. Then, the partner(s) translated the Morse Code back into English, and compared their answers! Most groups were close in translation, with only a letter or two off, so I consider that a success!

Maybe next year, I will take it to the next level and have students actually include a “toy” component to their electric circuits!

Newton’s Balloon Rocket Cars

What is it about balloons? It doesn’t matter how old the kid is, you bring out a balloon, just the regular kind that you fill with your own CO2 ,  and the is an excitement in the air. My two-year old loves hitting balloons in the air, trying to keep it up as long as possible. The 7th grade students see a pack of balloons on my counter, and immediately are wanting to know if they will get to blow one up!

Good thing this time the answer was yes!

We have been wrapping up our study on Newton’s Laws. I wanted an activity that would require students to use their knowledge of all three laws in their design. A balloon rocket car fit perfectly. I based my design after what I saw here at kidzworld.com, however there are many variations to this activity using other materials!

Goals of the design:

  • Students were to design and create a “rocket car” that used the balloon to thrust the car forward.
  • Students needed to calculate the momentum of their car, and therefore find the velocity.
  • They measured the distance the car went and the time it took to go that distance.

Here are the materials that you need:

  • Styrofoam
  • Cardboard
  • Straight straws
  • Flexible straws
  • Wooden skewers
  • Bottle caps with a hole in them (used as wheels. You can easily make a hole by hammering a nail lightly through the center of the cap. I also had wooden wheels on hand, so I let the students choose which they wanted to use.)
  • Balloons
  • Tape
  • Scissors

Though the basic design of the car was going to be the same, there were several smaller choices students could make that would affect how well the car worked. For example, they could pick either cardboard or styrofoam to be the base of the car. Either wooden wheels or bottle caps could be used for the wheels. The wheels were attached by the skewers and/or straws underneath the base of the car. On top, a bendy straw was attached. At one end, students needed to secure the balloon. The other end was left open so someone from the group could blow the balloon up and be ready to race!

This car went the farthest. The group cut pieces out of the side to eliminate extra mass.

I allowed students three trials. Some had cars that moved fast, but not far. Others moved slow and steady and still others moved at all. If I had one more day to do this activity, I would have allowed them to change one thing about their designs to see if they could make their cars go farther or faster.

After their testing, recording and calculating of velocity and momentum, we discussed how Newton’s laws were involved.

Newton’s 1st Law

An object in motion stays in motion unless an unbalanced force acts upon it. Students understood this through the slowing down of the car from the friction. They also stated that if the car had more mass, that meant there was more inertia which made it harder for the balloon car to start moving.

Newton’s 2nd Law

F=ma. A more massive car would be harder to accelerate with the same force. Students figured out that more massive balloon rockets required much more balloon air power to get going. To increase acceleration, those balloons needed to be blown pretty big!

Newton’s 3rd Law

For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. The application of this law was fairly obvious to the students. They immediately realized that the force of the air coming out of the balloon from behind would push the balloon rocket forward with an equal amount of force!

The students love comparing their balloon rocket cars and would have loved a race! Maybe next time I can turn this into a Newton’s Laws tournament!

8 Easy Last Minute Dinner Ideas

So far this school year has been a whirlwind. There has been so much going on. I feel like from the time I wake up until the time I lay down again at night, I’m busy with something! Many families are probably in the same position, especially this time of year. Even in the crazy weeks, I like to sit down as a family for dinner. This has been especially important to me as our kids get older. We don’t often eat breakfast or lunch as a family, so the final meal of the day is where we can come together and spend some time. It’s not even about the food. It is about being together. It’s about sharing your day with people that care about you. As we sit down, we pray, talk, eat and enjoy each other’s company. Don’t get me wrong, it is usually not calm and peaceful at the dinner table with two little ones. However, it’s one of my favorite times of the day because we can be together!

But what do you cook on those crazy nights? Maybe you only have 15 minutes to throw something together. I’ve created a list of 8 last minute dinner ideas that can be put together quickly with little to no prep. My family typically eats at least one or two meals from this list a week. And that’s just fine by me!

1. Tacos

Um… this should be a last minute AND a regular planned dinner. Who doesn’t love taco night? These are so versatile that you can grab anything you have in your pantry, freezer or kitchen to a tortilla, roll it up and you’re done. Make it a taco bar so kids can choose what toppings to put in. Chicken, beef, fish, just veggies… it’s all good. Cheese, lettuce, and salsa with a little dollop of sour cream finishes it off. Put out a bag of tortilla chips and everyone is happy.

2. Quesadillas 

Super similar to taco night, quesadillas are a great anytime meal. My husband is the master quesadilla maker. He has been known to put anything and everything inside. Once, we had leftover Thanksgiving quesadillas, turkey and mashed potatoes included. All you need are some tortillas and cheese. Anything else is a bonus!

3. Grilled Cheese

This is a staple at our house during the week. Often, my husband is gone at least one dinner a week. Rather than cooking a full meal for my two year old and myself, I typically prepare a few grilled cheese sandwiches. Easy and yummy. You can turn a regular grilled cheese into something gourmet by adding a few simple ingredients. Sliced Granny Smith apple with cheddar, adding hummus, or even making it with mozzarella with some pizza sauce! The options are endless. Add some soup (canned or homemade) and it is a delicious meal for a chilly or rainy day.

4. Breakfast for Dinner

I am actually not a huge fan of having breakfast for dinner. I’m not really a huge fan of big breakfasts for breakfast either. But, my family loves it and I know many people love breakfast all day any day. Pancakes, waffles and french toast are classics. There are so many varieties of these that you can do. Add fruit, make it savory, add eggs or sausage to make a complete meal. You can even put your jammies on early and have breakfast for dinner the right way.

5. Salad with Chicken

I try to make a big salad to have with dinner early in the week, that way, it is available for dinners the next few days. However, in a pinch, add more to the salad, throw in some protein like cooked chicken breast (I’ve even thrown in cut up chicken nuggets… don’t judge) and boom! Delicious and healthy! If you have dinner rolls on hand, put them in the oven and have warm, bread ready to go in a few minutes.

6. Pizza

Oh man. Can you ever go wrong with pizza? This is a weekend must. And it doesn’t have to be take out! Our freezer is always stocked with a couple frozen pizzas. I also like to make homemade crusts ahead of time using this recipe from Momsbyheart.  You can freeze these crusts and pull them out whenever you need to whip up a delicious pizza. Sauce, cheese, and whatever toppings you like (and have in the house) make these easy to personalize. If you don’t want to make your own crusts, you can buy pre-made crusts, or use something a little more unconventional. We’ve made the pizzas on tortillas, bagels, English muffins, you could even put it on bread and make pizza grilled cheese!

7. Spaghetti

Always a classic. With meat sauce, without meat sauce, whatever you choose, it is a win. And I’m not talking about making your own sauce from scratch type of spaghetti. Boil the noodles, heat up the sauce from a jar, sprinkle some parmesan cheese on top and there you go. Use some of the salad you made from the previous night to go with it. Butter some slices of bread (anything you have on hand), sprinkle garlic powder on top and put it in the oven for a few minutes on broil, and you also have toasty garlic bread.

8. Baked Potato Bar

This is another recipe that you can work with what you have in the pantry and freezer. Bake the potatoes (or you can microwave them in a pinch) and set out several possible toppings. Butter and mayo, broccoli and cheese, chives, salsa, sour cream, bacon…. Endless options! Add a side salad if you feel the need for more greens.

Slowest Parachute Design

In 7th grade, we started right away with physics concepts. These are some of my favorite areas of science! I love teaching Newton’s laws, investigating forces and computing the simple math equations that come with! My students however, don’t always seem quite as eager!

While discussing friction one day, I decided a design lab was needed to boost their interest level and understanding. Students knew friction slowed things down, but some were having a little trouble thinking about why friction is also helpful! Someone replied with a comment about parachutes, and instantly I had my idea.

After class, I frantically searched every drawer of my classroom for a little bag of these:

I had collected them at a 4th of July parade this summer, just in case I had a brilliant idea.

With just a quick search online, I found several activities that related to what I was thinking: A Slowest Parachute Contest. Teachengineering.org had this lesson plan already created! It was simple to put together, used simple materials and taught the concepts I needed it to. Winning! Although I did make a new, slightly adapted worksheet, I followed this lesson pretty closely!

This took my class two class periods, although both classes were shortened because of other activities going on that week. You could most likely complete it in about an hour if needed. The first day, students were given the challenge and the supplies.

Supplies included:

  • One army man
  • A Plastic Bag
  • Newspaper
  • Construction Paper
  • Tissues
  • String
  • Tape

Day 1

  1. Students were put into groups of three, and each group had to decide which material they wanted as their parachute.
  2. Next, students cut their material into a circle. I was not specific on the size of the circle on purpose. Part of the lab is to see if the area has an affect on the parachute’s performance. Some students used a compass to help draw their circles, which was a great idea. They also put a small hole in the middle of the circle of their parachutes, after some discussion over whether this was actually a good idea or not (it is…and after discussing, most agreed).
  3. Before attaching the parachute, students needed to calculate the area of their circle. Yay for the math connection! We used the formula r2 . Students needed to be reminded to measure in cm so we all had the same units! At the end, we compared our surface area to the times of the parachute drops.

    Cutting out a circle
  4. Students could then tape or tie their army man to their parachutes using string. It was interesting to see the various ways students did this-some army men ended up falling upside down!

Day 2 – Testing!

At the beginning of our second day, we had about 5 minutes to make last minute adjustments to their parachutes. Then, student groups sent one “dropper” at a time to drop their army man while I timed the drop.

Each group was given three drops. There were a few “do-overs” when the parachutes hit a desk or chair on the way down. The times were then averaged. Unfortunately, I didn’t get any pictures of this, since I was using my phone to time the parachutes!

After each group had completed their drops, we had a discussion. It seemed to us that a larger parachute did help, but it was not necessarily the most important thing. Also, it seemed like the plastic bag material worked the best, but newspaper also worked well. I’m sure if we did this again, those results may vary.

Overall, the lab did seem to help students understand friction, especially air resistance. This activity was such an easy one to add last minute. Students were engaged, asking good questions about their designs and most importantly, gaining understanding of friction!

Triumph and Tragedy

Love for Logan

Have you heard about this story? This dear two year old, Logan, had a tragic accident with a car window. During his time in the hospital, his mother, Lisa, would post on Facebook any updates that occurred with her son while demonstrating her and her husband’s solid faith in Christ. Thousands of people began following their story and felt encouraged through Drew and Lisa’s courage and faith. Sadly, after a week without much progress, on August 24, 2017, Logan passed away.

I knew Logan quite well. In fact, my family is close friends with his parents and several members of the extended family. Because of this,it has taken me awhile to know what to post. In some ways, I just wanted to ignore it and keep posting about regular lessons. I could continue with another classroom activity or a recipe for the family. No one would really know the difference- not many people read this anyway. However, dealing with grief is a difficult thing. Ignoring the sadness won’t help. Even though this post won’t change the past, it can help honor sweet Logan and his family.

Our boys when they were about 6 months old.

My son is only a few weeks younger than Logan. The plan was for our boys to go through life together. We had imagined teachers comment about their mischievous ways. The two were going to play basketball together, already passing the balls around in the gym after church. We had assumed they would be performing in many more Christmas pageants as little stable animals like they did the Christmas before.

It hurts when things don’t go according to your plan. It’s painful to watch dear friends go through their (and your) worst nightmare. Yet, my family’s daily life has not changed dramatically. Even through the grief, we still wake, go to work, and put both our children to bed at night.  Earlier, I was chopping a watermelon up so my son would be able to eat it for the next week. It occurred to me for the one-thousandth time that these small things will always be different for Logan’s family.

My biggest question for God has been “Why them?” I feel panic moments when I think about how easily that could have been our family. Throughout the last few weeks I’ve looked at my son and tried to imagine what they might be going through. I can’t do it. It hurts too much.

We may never fully know why God took Logan away so young. However, God has been revealing Himself in small ways throughout this process. I have already seen certain broken relationships start to be restored. Others, who had seemingly drifted away from their faith, were seen in church the last few Sundays. Thousands of people followed this story and in doing so, shared hope with each other and glimpses of Christ’s love. God has been triumphant through Logan and this tragedy and will continue to work through it. Logan’s death may very well bring life to hundreds of others.

Even with that knowledge, it is not easy. After a death, especially that of a child, people often feel helpless. Nothing you do or say will bring the person back, yet, you want to do anything and everything you can to help. Someone posted this article called What You Can Do to Help a Grieving Family. It was written from a mother who also lost her son and contains ideas of what people can (and shouldn’t) do for a family who has experienced tragedy. 

Logan’s parents have seen an outpouring of people’s love in many ways mentioned in the article. They continue to receive gifts, donations and prayers from people in the community as well as hundreds of miles away. Yet even with the abundance of support, I think they will always have pain – the feeling of something missing. Nothing anyone can do will fix that. However, there is still hope. Because of Christ, they have the hope of eternity. Though the time on Earth will be difficult, it will be just a blink compared to the eternity they will have with Logan in the presence of Christ.

That is the triumph within the tragedy.

Elements of a Successful School Bulletin Board

Our school’s academic theme this year is science. This means we will be having a few more extra events and activities relating to the sciences. In the spring, we will have a science fair and STEM night.  It’s exciting, but means a little bit more work for me this year!

In one of my previous posts I shared some of the bulletin boards up in my classroom. I was still working on a science themed board for our middle school hallway. I thought I would share that today.

A fellow teacher found this one on Pinterest for me and I’m so thankful! (I could only find the picture and not any website to go with it!) I immediately loved the idea of making a periodic table, but rather than it having the true elements, including the important characteristics for a school. What a great way to introduce the school to our new middle school students and to remind returning families what makes a school truly successful.

How to create one yourself:

It didn’t take much to put it together. I made each element box on the computer and printed them out. The symbol went in the top left and the “atomic number” in

 the top right. The “name” or characteristic when on the bottom. That was it! I was surprised at how quickly I thought of the different “elements”. I used some from the picture I saw, but included many of my own as well. Since we are also studying the Fruits of the Spirit this year, I made sure those were incorporated into the board.

Examples:
  • Pt: Patience
  • K: Kindness
  • A : academics
  • Ri : Rigor
  • F : Failthfulness

You can choose whatever characteristics describe your school and the ways it is successful.

I then decided to back them in different colors, just like elements on the periodic table are sometimes displayed. I used 32 element characteristics    , but you could do more or less. Just make sure you arrange them to look like a periodic table for the board to make sense! And I have to give a shout out to my husband – he helped me staple everything in a straight line. That is the hardest part!

I have had so many compliments on this board. I may just leave it up for a few months!

 

Saving Sam – A Great First Day Activity

 School started over a week ago for me! I’m just feeling like I’m back into the swing of things. It always takes a little while to get back into the habit of packing my lunch, organizing my lessons and getting my teacher voice back. Those first few days are hard on the vocal cords!

Because those first days of school require SO many instructions and procedures, it can be hard to really get into learning. However, the learning is what we want for our students! Maybe you all make the rules of how to line up for PE super exciting, and going through the weekly schedule extra suspenseful for your students. I, however, tire of those things quickly. But what can you do to shake things up a little?

My students must Save Sam! Saving Sam is a great first (or second or third) day activity for students from upper elementary through high school. I found this activity online (through Pinterest of course) a few years ago and LOVE using it to break up those “instruction” days.

Saving Sam

I’m not sure where I originally saw this activity, but there are many different places on the web that you can find it now. Here is the adapted version that I use in my classroom:

Materials

  • Gummy worm
  • Clear, plastic cup
  • Gummy LifeSaver
  • 2 Paper clips

Instructions

Student are paired up. Once they receive their materials, they must set up Sam as shown below:

The cup is upside down with the gummy Lifesaver underneath. “Sam” is on top of the cup. The students use the paper clips to help Sam!

 

The goal of this activity is for students to get the “life preserver” out from under the “boat” and onto Sam. Now, when I say onto Sam, I don’t mean just resting on top. Every time I do this, students immediately think they just have to get the lifesaver out from under the cup. Nope. Get it ON the worm. Students might think it isn’t possible, but it is! It just takes a little extra work! Any time someone touches any part with their hands, that group must begin again. If Sam or the life preserver hit the floor or desk, they also must start over.

End Results

Success!

After about 10 minutes, some students are successful, and some are not. Some groups tried the same thing over and over, while others continually changed their approach That’s ok! I actually don’t care if they truly “Save Sam” or not. The point of this activity is to learn to work together in order to solve a problem. In my classroom, I often challenge students to come up with a solution to an activity on their own. Often times, their original idea may not work and they must adapt and try something else. Also, there is no one right way to complete the task! Students can be successful using a variety of methods and learn to think differently about the scenario.

Saving Sam fits perfectly into my mini lesson of how we will be doing science in my classroom for the year! It can be used as a first day (or week) activity in order to bring up those points I mentioned. You can also use it anytime throughout the year to work on problem solving skills in a fun way. 

 

Solar Eclipse of 2017 – It’s a big deal!

So if you haven’t already heard (which hopefully you have) there will be a huge event happening on Monday, August 21. A solar eclipse of this extent does not happen very often. And when it does occur, it is rare that we can actually see it from the US!

This solar eclipse will be a total solar eclipse for many areas of the United States. This means, that for a 70 mile wide path from Oregon down through South Carolina, people will be able to experience the total solar eclipse. North and south of that path will experience a partial solar eclipse. Depending how close or far away you are from that path, you will experience more or less of the eclipse! You can check out a map here to see the exact path.

What is a solar eclipse?

An eclipse occurs when the sun, earth and moon all align in a specific way. During a solar eclipse, the moon “blocks” the sun from the Earth. In other words, the moon is creating a shadow on a small part of the earth’s surface.

Image Credit: NASA 2017 Total Solar Eclipse Event Page. Image not to scale.

 

Because of the size differences, the moon only casts a shadow on a small part of earth’s surface. For this shadow to be directly in your path is pretty incredible and a once in a lifetime experience!

Image credit: Wikipedia.org

So what should you do?

1. Get Glasses

You will need to have special certified glasses that filter out the sun’s harmful rays. Looking at the sun directly is very dangerous and can cause eye damage. This is NOT a good thing. The glasses help protect your eyes from the sun’s harmful rays. However, I think the glasses are selling out fast, at least in my town! I had to go to two several stores to find enough for my class. They sell glasses at Walmart, Lowe’s, Toys ‘R Us and possibly a few other places.

2. Check when the eclipse will happen near you

For us, the entire eclipse will take place between 12:56 pm and 3:46 pm. The closest to totality we will see happens at 2:22 pm. My plan is to take my science classes outside from 1:45-2:45.

3. Watch the weather

My big fear right now is that it will be storming or super cloudy on eclipse day. This would be sad, but fortunately, NASA will be offering live streaming of the event somewhere sunny! You can catch the live streaming here

4. Enjoy the show!

If you are lucky enough to be in the path of totality, soak it in! What an amazing sight. And if you’re not (like me) it will still be quite a show. It’s awesome to me how everything can line up just so. To me, it demonstrates our Creator’s creativity and power.

 

Monday, August 21 – Catch the Eclipse!