This is an activity I almost didn’t do with my class. I found this great resource for sound and pitch on PBS Design Squad and liked it, but wasn’t sure if I woudl do it. One of my classes this year has been somewhat of a challenge for me. They struggle with socializing. Although that is not anything new for middle school, this class seems to be the extreme. We’re working on it, but it makes me a little hesitant at times to try new activities when a lot of instructions may have to be given.

String Thing Game

I found this cool inquiry activity online and knew it was perfect for investigating pitch. But did I really want the students to work together on the Chromebooks to see what kind of noise they could make? It was a Friday after a pretty crazy week and to be honest, I did not have any other activity prepped, so this was it. And it was amazing! The student pairs worked quietly, stayed on task and LOVED doing it. Of course there was noise in the classroom – it is a sound game – but it was that awesome hum of productiveness. It was music to my ears!

String Thing Game, created by PBS Design Squad, has students explore how changing the length, tightness and type of string creates different pitches. Students can manipulate the features and to create different sounds and pitches. First, I had students just explore. How could they make a sound lower? What happened to make a sound higher? There are also demo songs where students can see all the different strings. Once they played on it for several minutes, I gave them the worksheet that the site created which asks specific questions on how different sounds are made. Finally, students attempted to make a song or tune online.

I originally had planned to only do this for 10 to 15 minutes, but when I observed how well the students were doing, I let them continue working until the end of the class! I even had students come up to me the following Monday to say they had played it at home. Win!

Build an Instrument

On Monday, I had students work in the same groups to create their own musical instruments and Build a Band, using their knowledge from the game. Cardboard boxes, rubber bands and wooden dowels were the only materials needed. I challenged them to create a song using four “strings”. Some groups immediately knew the song they were singing and could adjust the bands accordingly. Others decided to put the bands down, and then try to come up with a song. Although rubber bands are a little tricky to keep “in tune” because they can stretch or become looser, most students recognized how to adjust the pitch. I’m not saying that all the songs were perfect, but when the groups “performed” their songs, most students could figure out what tune was being played.

The class had so much fun with this activity – they could be social and musical at the same time. Yet they were still learning! Thanks PBS Design Squad! I’ll definitely be looking to them for more lessons in the future.

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