Last week I posted about how to simulate counting populations using the “Capture-and-Release-Method.”  (Click here to see!) This week, continuing on the population theme (and using dried beans in the classroom), I wanted to share a population extinction game!

I found this activity on tes.com, which is a site that contains many different lesson plans for teachers. And it is free to register! Click here to see the lesson (although you may have to sign up to actually see it).

The activity uses the Wild Atlantic Sturgeon as an example population, however you could adapt it to any type of animal you would like. The link directs you to the instructions for the game, and a simple game board – a paper with boxes numbered 1-6. It also includes a chart where students can record their data.

Materials needed:

  • Instruction sheet, game board and data sheet (can be downloaded for free from the website!)
  • 20 small items of something (I used beans, but the instructions say paper clips)
  • A cup of extra items for each group (they may need more!)

Procedure:

  1. Give each group of students 20 beans (or whatever you chose to use) to start off with.
  2. Students toss/drop the 20 beans onto the game board
  3. Any beans that land on sections 1 and 3 are considered “extinct” and are removed from the game.
  4. Any beans that land in section 5 “reproduce” so you add another bean for each.
  5. Beans that land on any of the other squares are kept with no changes.
  6. Students record their numbers in the chart provided, then repeat steps 2-4 with any beans they have left for 10 total rounds.

Over time, students should notice the amount of their sturgeon slowly declining!

Discussion questions to use:

  • What years did you gain the most?
  • What years did you lose the most?
  • Did your population of sturgeon become extinct? Why are why not?
  • If so, how many years did it take?
  • Why do you think your population declined?

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