Every year, our school has a different academic theme. Every 4-5 years, it is science’s turn. And this was the year. This also means this is the year I am in charge of many extra activities for our students to participate in. This past week, our school held a science fair. This was an evening open house event for parents to come and see the different projects students have been working on (some since September!)

Putting together a night like this was not easy, but overall, I would say it was worth it. Both students and families enjoyed seeing the different projects and taking part in different STEM activities.

Here are some ideas that helped make our science fair a success this year:

Start planning early!

We began having meetings in October to plan for an event taking place at the end of February. My committee consisted of 3 other teachers and myself, which is not large by any means. However, 6 weeks before the event occurred, we had ideas for all activities, an outline for the night and each person knew which items they would be responsible for. We did end up making a few changes in the days before, but this were not a big deal since everyone knew their responsibilities.

Inform teachers of expectations

We made informational packets for each grade level teacher to inform them of guidelines for student projects. Obviously, the guidelines for 1st grade looked very different from the 8th grade. Our goal was for students to learn at their own level. Some classroom teachers allowed their younger students to simply research a science topic and write it, displaying what they learned on small posters. Other teachers in the middle grades walked through the scientific process by doing a whole class experiment. Students were responsible for collecting their data during the school day, then they did their write ups and posters in class with teacher supervision. Middle school students were responsible for coming up with their own experiments. Although I walked them through each step throughout the year, most of the work was done by themselves. They displayed their work on trifold display boards. Differentiating the projects in this way made sure students were learning at their level! Students also were very proud of their final projects

Include activities for the family

From the very beginning, we promoted our fair as a family event. We encouraged families to come together to see the student experiments! Creating simple stations for students and families to “do science” together helped! We decided three activities were enough to provide variety, but still not overwhelming for us to plan and staff.

  1. Snowman Paper Challenge – using 2 pieces of plain paper and a small amount of tape, families had to create the tallest snowman, making sure it still had the shape of a snowman
  2. Density Exploration – We had three different liquids in beakers with a variety of different small objects. Participants predicted if they thought the objects would sink or float and then tested it out!
  3. Oobleck! – This station was by far the biggest hit. Participants could mix up their own batch of the mind -boggling non-newtonian fluid and play around with it. Parents and students alike had fun with this one!
Announce Winners!

During the day, our middle school projects were judged by volunteers associated with the school. These judges all had science backgrounds and used a rubric to score the different projects. At the end of the night, we announced the winners to the families! Students won a ribbon as a prize and I also gave them a “100 Grand” (since no prize money was involved). Even though the prizes were not huge, the build up to who the winners might be was very exciting for both students and families!

There are just a few basic tips that helped our science fair night be a success!

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