I’m not very big into making New Year’s resolutions. When you’re a teacher, you view the year a little differently… the “New Year” starts in August, or maybe even July, rather than January. Recently though, the conversation of resolutions keeps coming up in online articles, tv shows and even in conversations. It got me thinking about how as teachers, it is pretty cool to be able to “start over” halfway through the school year.

Now I know coming back in January is not quite like the beginning of the school year, but I see this as a good thing. The students already know the procedures, rules and routines of the day. All the beginning of the school year craziness doesn’t exist in January, so you can actually focus on a few ways to change and improve the classroom, your teaching methods, or just your attitude.

Here are a five New Year’s Teacher Resolutions

1. Get Organized

I always intend to get everything cleaned up and put papers perfectly in the appropriate folder and binder during the summer months. That NEVER happens. When the last day of school rolls around, I’m frantically finishing grades and stuffing things in closets before the cleaning crew needs to come through. If I would simple spend 10 minutes at the end of each week organizing, recycling and putting away materials in their proper places, I would not have this problem. This applies to my home too. Spending a few extra minutes each night or even weekend would go a long way!

2. Don’t grade everything

Let’s face it. Some of the homework we give to students is busy work. Sure it may be helpful or good practice for the students. But is it completely necessary for me to grade every piece of paper the students complete? Absolutely not. Families also appreciate it when their child doesn’t have hours of homework every night. So I plan to be selective with the homework I give, make time in class for students to self check, and not grade everything!

3. Pay more attention to students’ lives – not just their grades

Students love when they are actually heard. I’ve noticed that if I can spend two minutes with a student in a conversation about something other than school work, their attitude changes. Sometimes I get too busy with trying to get things done that I forget to take the time to really talk with my students. A few minutes here and there can make a big impact.

4. Roll with it

During even the most normal school day, things do not go as planned. The copier will break. The administrator will walk into the classroom right as a demonstration for the class failed. The perfectly planned lesson will end up taking half the amount of time as you though. And it’s OK. Getting frustrated or upset only makes my day worse. And if the students see me get flustered, they get flustered too. So when things get a little crazy, I will be flexible. That’s what YouTube is for anyway.

5. Stay Positive

Sounds easy, right? But if you have even worked in education for a fraction of the year, you know how difficult this can be. Student issues, parent problems, colleagues complaining – all of these things can bring me down quite easily. Thinking about one exciting, fun or encouraging thing going into the day makes it that much better walking into my classroom. And when I leave at the end of the school day, reflecting on what went WELL instead of the stresses can make the rest of the night a much more pleasant evening! It takes conscious effort to do this and some days can be extremely difficult – sometimes it means saying a prayer and just giving the problems to God. However, it can make a huge impact on the way I teach!

Even though I wrote these resolutions from a teacher perspective, I think they can apply to all areas of life – inside the classroom and out.

Whatever your resolutions (or if you have any at all), may your new year be full of blessings from God!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Comment *